First Impressions: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders, Ao Haru Ride, Parasyte, Tokyo Ghoul

We did it folks. It took a lot longer than the one week I was anticipating, but the seeding process is finally complete. Just these four previews to go, and then I’ll create a separate post for the bracket so we can get this tournament underway!

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Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders

The third and final sequel entered in this tournament, Stardust Crusaders has a lot to live up to in the original Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, a shounen fighting series so old that it’s managed to both establish and subvert every trope in the book. Thankfully, based on this premiere, I’d say it’s on the right track. David Production clearly has a bigger budget this time around, as the animation is much flashier than it was last season. It’s not so smooth that it loses the charm of Hirohiko Araki’s 80s character designs, though. Speaking of which, I love Joseph Joestar’s character design (pictured above) as a grandfather who’s dragged back into the fight against evil after his father’s murderer returns to life using Jonathan’s body. And now that he’s working alongside his grandson, Jotaro, there’s all sorts of potential for family drama. Jotaro’s attitude towards his mother was a problem for me, but it’s consistent with JJBA’s relegation of women to passive roles. The 1980s were a different time, I guess. That’s just a small blemish on an episode that set up a lot of promising dominos, however, so I have high hopes for this sequel to deliver the same adrenaline-pumping action and campy style as its predecessor.

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Ao Haru Ride

Ao Haru Ride’s first episode starts off rather well, with a pretty watercolor visual style and a convincing depiction of an awkward fateful encounter in the rain. The idealism in the art and the realism of the dialogue formed a perfect contrast, so for one brief and shining moment I thought this would be something more than the standard shoujo romance I had figured it would be when I selected it for the tournament. Unfortunately, as soon as the series flashed forward to the present, the watercolor style disappeared and the characters flatlined. Female lead is late for school? Check. Her friends make fun of the weird girl in class? Check. Girl explains the measures she took to achieve some measure of popularity? Check. Girl doesn’t understand why guy she likes is nice to her one minute and aloof the next? Check.

The hook here is that the boy in the watercolor flashback moved away, ruining any shot that he and Futaba had at romance. Several years later, though, he returns to town as a teacher, having changed his name and personality. I guess he skipped several grades during his absence, or else I just misunderstood his request that his former classmates call him “sensei.” This might have grabbed my interest if the conversation between the two leads hadn’t been so stereotypically hot and cold, and Futaba’s reaction hadn’t been so predictably confused. This show gets some points for featuring a high school cast rather than Shigatsu’s middle school students, but I’d say the latter had a better first episode.

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Parasyte -the maxim-

This was one of the best first episodes of the tournament, and probably the best anime episode I’ve ever watched that featured a boob grab. Apparently that scene wasn’t in the manga, but since Shinichi’s right hand quite literally has a mind of its own, it gets a pass. Everything else was phenomenal. Using the alien burrowing scene as a flashback (rather than opening with it) was smart, because it allowed the director to cultivate a curiosity about who was talking to Shinichi that morning, and what his dad meant by, “Did you find the snake?” There’s an ah-hah! moment when the flashback finally comes, because we already know how he stops the alien’s progress through his arm, but the scene retains a sense of urgency because of some killer direction.

The evolution of both main characters is paced very nicely: the alien uses Google and reads biology textbooks to gain a massive amount of knowledge in a short period of time, while Shinichi takes baby steps by increasing his appetite (what a courteous host) and relinquishing his fear of bugs. Despite Shinichi’s fear and confusion at what’s happening to him, he and his new parasite appear destined for a symbiotic relationship. The alien’s cute voice and visible disappointment at having failed to reach his host’s brain are important tools in making it a sympathetic character, and Shinichi’s horrified reactions to his affliction lend a tense, realistic atmosphere to an unrealistic premise. I even find that the heavy use of dubstep, which a lot of bloggers are taking issue with, helps evoke an unsettling mood that goes nicely with the series’ subject matter.

I don’t want to write as much about this show as I did about Mushishi, but I could. It’s that good. They’re on opposite sides of the bracket, so if they both keep winning, they won’t play until Round 5. What a match that would be.

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Tokyo Ghoul

The two horror series in the tournament ended up being the last two shows I watched. Aside from the fact that both main characters are part human and part something else, however, Tokyo Ghoul is very different from Parasyte. The scope of the story is much larger right off the bat: the cold open here features a masked ghoul hunter, very likely some kind of supernatural creature himself, with “orders from above” to capture another ghoul alive. Elsewhere there’s talk of distributing feeding grounds, managing wards of Ghouls, and an organization called Anteiku, regarded by opponents as fence-sitters but who wield a lot of influence nonetheless. All of these potential plot points are only briefly alluded to, which creates a lot of questions for the next episode to answer.

Protagonist Kaneki becomes half ghoul when the organs of another ghoul who nearly killed him are transplanted into his body. His sense of taste deteriorates, he tries and fails to injure himself, and eventually he’s driven by hunger to seek human flesh for himself. All of this is stylishly animated by Studio Pierrot, but I wasn’t fully engaged during this episode, well-produced as it was. The periodic censorship of gorier images may have contributed to that feeling, but beyond that I’m not connecting with Kaneki very well. To throw all delicacy out the window, the guy is a wimp. Obviously this first episode put him through hell, but so far he’s not the kind of main character I can really root for. Still, this was a solid premiere, so I’ll gladly watch another couple episodes at least.


And so, First Impressions week comes to a close. I’ll be posting the bracket shortly, along with some thoughts on the current crop of shows and which matchups to keep an eye on going into Round 1.

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