Round 2: Kyousougiga vs. Gatchaman Crowds, Gingitsune vs. Yowamushi Pedal

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Kyousougiga – Episode 2

There was a long stretch of silence in this episode that seemed at first to be artistic, then started to try my patience, and finally revealed itself to pack quite an emotional punch. That’s a good description of the show as a whole, as well. Its schizophrenic presentation jumps from one visual style to another, but it’s consistently inventive and often beautiful. I’ve said enough in the past about how deliberately opaque the show with regards to its characters, but the advantage to telling stories about families, even when you’re not sure who’s who and how they’re related, is that our personal experiences with our own families make them universally powerful. When Koto realizes that Inari is her father, and it clicks in our heads that this moment was the source of her motivation to travel to Mirror Kyoto in search of her mother, all the confusion and ambiguity evaporates in a heartbeat.

What I’m most curious about at this point is the nature of Koto’s training. She belongs to an organization called Shrine, whose members carry swords, hold the title of “priest,” and can apparently visit other dimensions. There’s a big emphasis on combat: students are not discouraged from fighting amongst themselves, merely given instructions such as, “Keep your arms closer to your body!” when they throw punches. Exams consist of being suspended inside a giant floating cube while scientists measure your priestly potential, I guess? This scene reminded me heavily of another one from the first episode, where a bunch of folks in lab coats watched Koto and her spirit pals wreak havoc in an alternate dimension (which we now know to be Mirror Kyoto). Sometimes I wonder how much of this show’s repetition is intentional and how much results from the director’s obsession with certain themes, but either way, the end product is a fun puzzle that I intend to finish, no matter when the series takes its second loss.

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Gatchaman Crowds – Episode 3

If I had to pick one word to describe this episode, it would be “anticlimactic.” Gatchaman Crowds has introduced a superhero organization whose members carry notebooks that let them transform into robots, a smartphone app that miraculously compels people to work together for the good of humanity (run by a cross-dressing genius and his army of glowing eyeballs), and a villain who mimics people’s physical appearance by kissing them, and what kind of story does it choose to tell this week? A bad shipment of milk has gone out, so let’s use social media and stop people from drinking it. I do appreciate the show’s dual commentary on technology and empathy, but when you introduce an antagonist like the MESS and suddenly come to terms with them, you have to move onto the next conflict a little more quickly. The end of this episode gave us a standoff between Joe and our nameless, wild-haired villain, as well as the start of a rescue mission that may force our programming genius out from the shadows, but it’s too little, too late to save this show from the jaws of elimination.

The Verdict: I thought this decision would be a lot tougher, but after a rather silly third outing I’m ready to drop Gatchaman Crowds. From the tournament, anyway – I’ll probably watch the next episode to see how this cliffhanger resolves.


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Gingitsune – Episode 3

Apart from a brief scene near the start, this episode of Gingitsune left its burdensome school setting behind and focused on the shrines and spirits I’d been wanting to see from the beginning. None of the humans here are strong characters, but they don’t need to be, so long as the show commits itself to telling individual stories about new heralds each week. This time we were introduced to a displaced turtle whose shrine was, of course, torn down as a result of urbanization. His slow speech, impotent fury at the construction crew that drove him from his home, and gratitude at having found a new shrine to occupy were all very charming. I’d be grateful to live there, too – just look at the screenshot above! The background (and foreground) art in Gingitsune really is a treat to behold, but this is the first time I can say I’ve truly enjoyed an episode. Judging by the preview for the next one, two major characters are about to make their entrance, and one of them is a human male around Makoto’s age. Let’s hope his introduction doesn’t take us back to high school.

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Yowamushi Pedal – Episode 3

I’m so relieved that Yowamushi Pedal was able to rediscover the charm of its premiere with this third episode. Onoda was back to his earnest, awkward self rather than the stunted outcast we saw last time, and that’s great news for Yowapeda’s future. There’s a whole laundry list of things that set this show apart from Ace of Diamond, the other traditional sports series of the tournament. Among them are the superior character designs and clearer motivations, but the biggest difference lies in their protagonists. Onoda is a novice in the cycling world, as opposed to Eijun, who was his middle school team’s only experienced player. Given the choice between the two of them, I’d say it’s much more rewarding to watch a rookie learn the ropes and slowly become a strong competitor. Onoda is also on the fence about joining the bicycle racing club to begin with, as his main passion lies elsewhere, so we’ll get to see him fall in love with the sport from the beginning. Plus, his desire to connect with other people is clearly present, despite his lack of close friends, so we can watch him develop socially. This is the kind of sports anime I could see myself following each week for a good long while.

The Verdict: Surprisingly, I’m a little reluctant to drop Gingitsune from the bracket this week. After getting such little enjoyment from its premiere, I figured it was destined for a quiet three episode death, but I’ll probably check out the next episode in my spare time.


NEXT UP: Sekai Seifuku vs. Knights of Sidonia, Barakamon vs. The World is Still Beautiful

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